Irish Whiskey

On our recent honeymoon trip I sat in a cozy hotel bar in Co. Donegal, trying to decide what I’d like to drink. Whiskey (duh), and there was a dazzling amount of choice. But they were featuring in their drinks menu Greenore Single Grain, a small-batch artisanal whiskey to which Gerry had exposed me a couple years earlier, so I ordered that.

This is the waitress coming to tell me they are out of Greenore. (sigh)

This is the waitress coming to tell me they are out of Greenore. (sigh)

Well, I didn’t have Greenore, but if you get the opportunity (and yes, you can get it in the States), you should. My point, though, is there are many choices. I’ve enjoyed Kilbeggan (blended), Conemarra (peated, single malt), Tyrconnell (single malt), and my old standby, Jameson (blended), in addition to Greenore, my current fave.

So when Gerry sent me this article—The great Irish whiskey bubble—this morning, I was intrigued. “There are 28 new Irish whiskey distilleries either proposed are already underway,” it says.

Whoa.

It’s an interesting article, primarily (for me) for the background:

Ireland’s trademark is pot still whiskey, made from a mixed mash containing both malted and unmalted barley, because historically the government levied higher taxes on malted whiskeys than on unmalted. It is traditionally distilled three times, whereas Scotch whisky is only distilled twice. … At each stage of distillation, the output from the first and last hour are discarded because the best tasting product happens midway through the process.

I ended up drinking Jameson that afternoon as the sun went down beyond the rose garden. Cheers!

• • •

And yes, we’re back, and I’m digging out from the pile of mail and work and laundry that always follows a vacation. I’ll start writing up the posts very soon, so stick around—we had a great time. I’ll be back!

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s